Tag Archive | "stroller"

Nimble Scooters 2014

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Nimble Scooters 2014


Nimble Cargo Scooter Beach

Nimble  Scooters of Irvine, California, has just launched their latest cargo scooter design in Europe at the Fietsvak Bike Show in Amsterdam this past March. With a very strong and lightweight aluminium frame and a vibrantly colored roto-molded plastic cargo tub, you can tell this scooter was built for heavy duty. Whether it’s for personal and leisure use, for small businesses or warehouse operators, the cargo scooter is made to help carry belongings easily over a short distance in a fun and convenient way.

Having won a spot at WantedDesignNYC’s LaunchPad, Nimble Scooters will be exhibiting during New York City’s International Design Week to officially mark the launch in the United States. The fair takes place from May 16-19th. More information here: www.wanteddesignnyc.com/wanteddesign-2014/launch-pad/
Based in California, the studio is looking for retailers along the coast and across the United States, as well as seeking opportunities to promote their scooter.

www.nimblescooters.com

Posted in bakfiets, Load Carrying, special purpose, trailers, Work CyclingComments (0)

Nimble Cargo Scooter

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Nimble Cargo Scooter


Nimble Scooter Pacific Blue

Nimble Cargo Scooters is a company that manufactures cargo scooters in Irvine, California. The scooters start at $299 and are built with aircraft aluminum and baltic birch. You can order them with custom colors and graphics. They ride amazing well and are extremely stable with their low center of gravity.

At only 25 lbs, they’re very lightweight and compact. Also, they’re much smaller than a regular bicycle. While test riding a Nimble last week, we were able to walk into most stores like Target without the workers batting an eye. Think of it as a running stroller you can ride.

If you’ve always wanted a bakfiets but couldn’t afford it. Then look no further. Try out a Nimble Cargo Scooter, which is easily a fourth of the cost of a good bakfiets or long bike.

Links:
nimblescooters.com

Posted in Load Carrying, special purposeComments (5)

Feetz: Leaning Trike, Independent Steering, Converts to Stroller

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Feetz: Leaning Trike, Independent Steering, Converts to Stroller


From it’s specifications list, the Feetz is one amazing tadpole trike (two front & one rear wheel). It has front independent steering (ackerman steering), converts almost instantly into a stroller, and leans into turns.

Most tricycles tend to feel tip prone because they can’t lean into turns like a bicycle. The Feetz over comes this through it’s leaning design. Without riding one, we can’t tell how it actually performs. However from their videos, the Feetz looks fantastic.

The only catch is that it retails for £1,200 in the UK, which means it’ll be well over $2000 US dollars by the time it reaches the States.

Links:
http://feetz.nl

Posted in Family Cycling, Load Carrying, tricycles, Work CyclingComments (6)

Taga Stroller – Game Changer?

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Taga Stroller – Game Changer?


So, is this the major game changer that we’ve all been looking for? Or else, is it just another expensive industrial design study that only a few can afford?

Without having ridden one, I can only say that the new Taga Stroller/Tricycle looks amazing. Basically, it is a kid carrying cargo tricycle that converts on the fly into a walking stroller. WOW! Also, it has numerous optional features that allow it to be customized and outfitted in any number of ways.

The MAJOR drawback at this moment is the stunning price and lack of availability. Not yet sold in the US, it has a base price of $2500 without any options. Include shipping, handling, and customs duties, you’re pushing $3000 by the time you’re riding the base model in the States.

Early Verdict: Function and styling that any parent would love, price tag of a good used car.

Links:
Taga Website

Posted in City Cycling, Family Cycling, Load Carrying, tricyclesComments (11)

The Perils of Hybrid Design – Triobike Redux

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The Perils of Hybrid Design – Triobike Redux


Triobike is a Danish company that makes a family tricycle with a nifty “Multi-purpose Design” which can be converted from a tricycle to a bicycle to a stroller. On paper it has many of the design features that families are looking for such as 5 point harnesses for kids, front & rear lights, disk brakes, etc. It’s sleek minimalist European industrial design will send hearts aflutter anywhere. Who wouldn’t want a tricycle you could drive the kids to daycare with, convert into a bicycle, and then ride to work with.

However in the case of Triobike, it’s Achilles Heal may be that it does neither of it’s intended purposes very well. As a tricycle, reviewers are beginning to talk about it’s dangerously unstable ride. As a bicycle, it’s sporty design doesn’t lend itself well for city riding (no fenders, uncomfortable forward leaning style, men’s style swing over frame) Finally as a stroller it’s unwieldy bulk makes it impractical. Imagine a parent struggling to load it into a car or better yet trying to get it through the doorway of a local store with a sleeping toddler on board.

Hybrid designs in and of themselves are a neat idea. They take up less space but serve multiple purposes. However, history has been marked with endless hybrid designs that try to do too many things and fail to do any well. Airplanes that convert into a car, cars that convert into a boat, and so on.

In the case of Triobike, it’s a great idea with flawed execution. Like any groundbreaking innovative design there will be growing pains and hopefully an evolution to an ideal form. If the makers of Triobike continue to refine and iterate the design, then it has a great future. Otherwise, it’ll remain another industrial design study where style has won out over function, with the added bonus of a $3000 USD price tag.

Triobike Links:
www.triobike.com
Triobike photos by Carteco
Triobike Video

Other Luxury Cargo Tricycle Makers:
Winther Kangaroo
Nihola
MyZigo (US manufacturer)

Posted in Tech Talk, tricyclesComments (10)