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International Cargo Bike Festival

International Cargo Bike Festival

International Cargo Bike Festival

This year the International Cargo Bike Festival celebrates its third edition on 12 and 13 April 2014 at Cultuurspinnerij de Vasim in Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
The Cargo Bike Festival is the biggest platform for cargobikes and cyclelogistics in the world.

On Saturda

y 12 April the European Cycle Logistics Federation Conference is being held with national and international key note speakers.
Sunday 13 April welcomes the exhibition where visitors, users, designers, manufacturers, DIY-builders and retailers of cargo bikes meet and enter in new relationships.

The European Cyclelogistics Federation participates in the organisation of the event, as does the municipality of Nijmegen and Arnhem Nijmegen City Region.

http://www.cargobikefestival.com/

Posted in Load Carrying, other topics, Places & Events, Useful References, Work CyclingComments (0)

Promoting Cargo Cycling in the European Union

Back in May 2011, representatives from NGOs, the government, private sector business and industry analysis firms met in Copenhagen, Denmark to share different ideas for advancing the shift of goods and services transportation to non-motorized modes in European cities. This meeting also lies within the context of the CYCLE Logistics project, whose ultimate goal for 2014 is to save 1,300 tons (465,000 gallons) of fuel, put2,000 more cargo cycles into use in European Union (EU) cities, and shift 10,000 trips to inter-modal transport chains (bicycles and tricycles used with other modes of transportation).
They are trying to encourage CYCLE Logistics under the European Cycling Federation to promote the benefits of cargo cycling. Businesses who use cargo cycling give customers an image of environmental responsibility, they also have a better chance of delivering their goods on time without having to deal with traffic and road infrastructures.
Accessibility is also increased for those business who use cargo tricycles to reach out to people, where stores cannot. As a result, replacing motorized transportation with cargo cycles does not contribute to air quality degradation and pollution.

This is not the first time Europe tries to really encourage the use of cargo cycling as a real means of transport. In the United States, we often regard cargo cycling as a fun weekend pastime or leisurely activity. We don’t really see cargo scooters as being used for professional use – but it’s coming! What really needs to happen, which is what the CYCLE Logistics project strives to do, is promote a behavioral change within a culture. They try pushing Europeans to transport goods and services with cargo cycles—among all individuals, organizations, businesses and levels of government.

In China actually, this has already been the case for a long time. In large cities with dense populations, millions of bicycles and cargo tricycles are being employed for daily transportation of people and goods. Whether it transports garbage, fruit, a mini barbecue, stacks of chairs or hay, the Chinese have been very creative in using cargo scooters in any way to help them with their business or wherever they need to go.

The population density of Chinese cities has resulted in hundreds of millions of bicycles and tricycles being employed for daily transportation, many of which are utilized in the cargo fashions that the CYCLE Logistics project desires to produce.

To read more about this movement and CYCLE Logistics, please visit and read the article from  http://thecityfix.com/blog/the-eu-meets-to-discuss-how-to-promote-cargo-cycling/

Posted in bakfiets, City Cycling, Commuting, Family Cycling, Load Carrying, other topics, Places & Events, Useful References, Work CyclingComments (8)

Atomic Zombie Bicycle Builder’s Bonanza

Brad Graham and Kathy McGowan have written an amazing book called Atomic Zombie Bicycle Builder’s Bonanza. This book is a “must have” for anyone that loves to tinker and make things. Inside the book are detailed instructions and over 200 photos that teach you how to hack, modify, and build bicycles using minimal tools. 

The book is written in a clear and easy to understand style that walks you through real projects ranging from playful to surreal. Anyone who loves DIY projects will love this book. After reading it, you’ll be ready for any Franken-Bike creation.

I found the book on Amazon for about $17 and they even had an electronic version available for an additional $5.  It won’t compare to the two week frame building course at the United Bicycle Institute. But if you think of the cost of tuition and room & board, this book is a real bargain. Also checkout Brad Graham’s website, which is definitely worth a visit.

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Open Source Design: Jetrike

Jetrike
I ran across this website while doing research on leaning tricycles. The inventor of Jetrike has put all of his notes, working drawings, and research onto his webpage in hopes of fostering innovation in the field. His work is amazingly detailed and useful for anyone trying to develop a leaning trike with popular appeal.

We’d like to applaud his generosity and willingness to share. Keep up the great work!

Posted in DIY, Load Carrying, Tech Talk, tricycles, Useful ReferencesComments (3)

Biketrailershop.com

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Check out Biketrailershop.com, an online retailer specializing in bike cargo trailers.

Biketrailerblog.com, dedicated to bike trailers.

Cello, an unique bike case travel system for BOB trailers.

All three sites were started by Josh Lipton, here is his interesting blog where he talks in depth about running his own small start-up business.

Posted in Family Cycling, Load Carrying, trailers, Useful ReferencesComments (0)

Workbike.org

Logo_zero
Interested in workbikes, Workbike.org offers tons of info on workbikes.
Featuring a list of manufacturers, pedicab and cargo delivery businesses, online forums, books, history, organizations, etc.

Looks like the site is related to Zero Couriers, they claim to operate the largest fleet of freight cycles in London.  Check out their blog under workbike news.

Posted in shops, Useful References, Work CyclingComments (4)

Leitra and Velomobiles

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Recumbent trikes with full fairings came from human powered vehicle (HPV) racing.  One was Mike Burrow’s Windcheetah, originally intended as a stable HPV trainer for HPV racers.  Recumbent enthusiasts soon discover the advantanges of a fully faired trike for commuting compared to a full faired recumbent bike.  There is no need to balance the vehicle at stops, no worries of side wind blowing the vehicle around.

Velomobile became the term used to describe these fully faired recumbent trikes built for commuting in traffic and offering all-weather protection.

One of the most well know is the Leitra, with a flip-forward front section that allows entry and exit of the rider.

Check out velomobile.net for more info on velomobiles.

Posted in Commuting, Load Carrying, tricycles, Useful ReferencesComments (0)

Center for Appropriate Transport and Human Powered Machines

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(quoted from their website…)

The Center for Approriate Transport (CAT) is a non-profit organization committed to community involvement in manufacturing, using, and advocating sustainable modes of transportation. The first organization of its kind, the Center was founded in Eugene, Oregon in the fall of 1992. Since that time we have established a number of projects under one roof designed to further this mission.

Human Powered Machines was established in 1991. Our primary interest is in relieving urban congestion by building load-carrying workbikes. We also produce many types of vehicles including recumbents, utility trailers, folding bikes, hand- powered vehicles and farm machines.

The trike pictured to the right was designed by Human Powered Machines.


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John Forester & Effective Cycling

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Anyone interested in cycling in traffic should take a look at John Forrester’s website.

He is a Cycling Transportation Engineer who wrote ‘Effective Cycling’ and ‘Bicycle Transportation: A Handbook for Cycling Transportation Engineers’

He promotes the idea that "cyclists fare best when they act and are treated as drivers
of vehicles
".

He also offers a traffic-cycling course for riders of all ages.  Check out the ‘Effective Cycling’ dvd.

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Folding Bicycle Society

Airnimal_folding_bicycle_1
For those interested in folding bikes, check out the Folding Society site.

Bikefold.com sells various models of folding bikes.

To the right, are folders made by Airnimal.

Posted in bicycles, Portable, Useful ReferencesComments (0)

North American Handmade Bicycle Show 2007 (San Jose, CA)

AhearneI just posted my photos from the North American Handmade Bicycle Show at the San Jose Convention Center. There was a huge number of custom bicycle builders from all over the world attending the show. The variety of bikes ranged from all out velomobiles to rat bikes built with found materials. It was great talking with the builders who went out of their way to be friendly and answer any questions.

Some of the themes I noticed throughout the show:

Some fun stuff I saw at the show:

My photos from the show on Flickr

Posted in City Cycling, Commuting, DIY, Family Cycling, Load Carrying, Mobility Impaired, Places & Events, Portable, Touring, Useful References, Work CyclingComments (2)

Bicycle Maintenance Book Recommendations

Barnett’s Manual: Analysis and Procedures for Bicycle Mechanics (4 Vol. Set)

• Comprehensive reference on all makes of bicycles and components
• Tons of great diagrams that walk you through each step
• Expensive – $115 for the manual and $85 for the optional CD-ROM from the BBI website (OUCH!)
• Worth the money for any professional or serious home mechanic

The Bicycle Book (Haynes Automotive Repair Manual Series)
• Book for general bicycle maintenance
• Good book for the average home mechanic
• In-expensive (around $16 at Amazon)

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