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Republic: Cargo Bikes for Kids

Tired of hauling your kids and your groceries by bike? Make them pull their own weight, and some extra.

 

 

Republic Bike’s mini-cargo-tricycle, one of very few cargo bike options for kids on the market, comes in 5 different colors, feature a front wooden crate with a maximum recommended load of 10lbs (approx 4.5 kilos) and a bell. The tricycle build guarantees stability for the young riders, with a recommended riding age of 4 to 6 years old.

The bike itself is simple; the Florida based company focused on providing a dutch-style bicycle with a single speed and back-pedal brakes.

Retails for $349 on Republic Bike’s website.

Links:

www.RepublicBike.com

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The Shopping Mama

You may know Republic Bikes from… their fleet of multi-colored bikes for Google‘s campus in Mountain View, CA.

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Bibliobicicletas: Cargo Bikes Turned Libraries

They come in all shapes and sizes. Some are associated with public libraries or schools, others with community efforts or local book shops. All have one goal: bring the books to the people!Whether they’re called Book Bikes, Library on Wheels, Bibliobicicletas, or another variation on the theme, here is a selection of cargo bikes dedicated to wheeling books around.

Find them at your local park, open streets events, festivals and more.

The idea is not new – as a cheap way to get more bikes into homes, they are a good way to “bandage” poor access to public libraries, and the amount of “book bikes” throughout the world are countless. Oregon’s Street Books, for example, specifically works with the homeless community and rents books out to them for free (read more about Street Books in this article by the New York Times).

As for the bikes that pull them and the varying setup – there is no one right way. Whether a trike, a trailer, or a one-of-a-kind setup, as long as it rolls and can carry and display bikes, it works.

Links to the various websites and builders:

Pima County Book Bike – Haley Tricycles

Oregon Street Books

San Francisco’s BibliobicicletaBikes at Work

Oakland’s Bike Library – Kick Trailer

Berkeley’s Library on Wheels

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Two Rivers Cider Bike

Don’t call this a beer bike – it pours cider only. Built especially for Two Rivers Cider Cider Co, a Sacramento, California company, it can carry up to 2 full kegs or 4 pony kegs, as long as you can pedal it. cider_bike_1

Vincent Sterne, owner and founder of Two Rivers, requested the bike be built sometime in 2013. “I like bicycles, I like bars. Seemed like a good fit to me,” he says, adding that they do a lot of events and the bike made it very convenient to roll up and serve with very little preparation or setup required. “With full kegs,” noted Sterne, “the bike is still easy to ride.” He credits the good build on local cargo bike maker John Lucas.

John Lucas, founder of CycleTrucks, is a Sacramento based bike builder. He makes about 20 to 30 bikes a year, although the Cider bike is the only bar bike he’s ever made. When Sterne first approached him about building the bike, Lucas went about it as he does with all the bikes he creates: “I look around at what others are doing, and then I try doing something new. We all drive different types of vehicles, and there’s room in the cargo world for many different designs yet. With the cider bike, Vince told he he wanted to build a bar bike, and I had seen some others and had ideas of the way I would do it.” cider_bike_2

The bike itself is a steel bike, and the kegs and bar area is ahead of the bike. The steering is left exposed at the top, and two taps are fitted through the wooden bar top. The frame itself is interesting; in a former career, Lucas was a bridge builder and worked with cranes. “You can see that experience translated on my bikes;” says Lucas, “the lattice work from the cranes, the tresses and what not, are inspired by bridges.”

You might not guess it, but the cider bike also features a component from an old Lincoln towncar, part of one of Lucas’ signature features: a unique kickstand. “It’s a center kickstand, that uses cables for restraint, and a gas spring like you would have to hold up the a hood of a car or the back of a hatchback. That way when you bring up the kickstand, it doesn’t slam, it folds smoothly.” And that gas spring is, you guessed it, pulled from Lincolns. The kickstand is sturdy enough to keep the bike steady when loaded, with say, two full kegs.

More about the builder:

John Lucas builds a variety of cargo bikes, always striving for smart design first. His flagship cargo bike is a 20″ inch wheeler with a built in cycle rack in the front with a long tail rack in the back. It’s smaller wheels makes it more convenient to take on transit and to store, but it can still carry a hefty load – as demonstrated by 5 friends of the builder in the picture below. Visit the CycleTrucks website for more information.

5 on the beavertail

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Cargo Race: Disaster Relief Trials

A disaster relief drill in the form of a cargo bike competition, simulating a day 4 supply run. Your neighbors need help, do you have a cargo bike?

Reuben Deumling was the fastest male Citizen rider in DRT PDX 2012 (Picture from Event Facebook page)

Reuben Deumling was the fastest male Citizen rider in DRT PDX 2012 (Picture from Event Facebook page)

This October in San Francisco an unusually well organized, thought out, and well-meaning race will be taking over the Presidio: Participants will be testing the effectiveness of their cargo bikes as a means to respond to an emergency situation, where streets are un-navigable by car and supply lines are cut off.

Mike Cobb, co-founder of Disaster Relief Trials along with Travis Wittwer and Ethan Jewett, has helped local organizers host 6 of these events in 4 cities, starting with Portland in 2012.  He originally came up with the idea of using cargo bikes for targeted relief efforts after witnessing the “inadequate Haiti earthquake recovery efforts during the winter and spring of 2010″.

The San Francisco trials race might ring particularly close to home for locals, as it takes place shortly after a 6.0 quake shook the North Bay in August. It also coincides with the 25th anniversary of Loma Prieta earthquake which crippled the Bay Area and caused widespread damage.

The Race

The race itself takes approximately 3 hours. Competitors can define their own route but must stop at all checkpoints, maneuvering along the way through rough terrain, water features and physical barriers all while carriers 50kg of cargo. First place goes to whomever finishes the fastest, although there is a time penalty for breaking any of the 3 inadequately protected eggs, which represent fragile relief supplies and must remain unscathed. Visit the event’s Facebook page for more information.

The goal of the race, says Cobb, is to “show-off the capabilities of the cargo bike under post-disaster conditions” and thus demonstrate their potential as a creative solution to dealing with infrastructure breakdown and providing citizen-led relief when and if first responders are focused on priority rescue missions. The race format was a conscious choice; “I like that people have fun making a powerful advocacy statement,” Cobb adds.

The video below, which can also be found on Vimeo here, is a short clip from the 2012 Portland Race. “There seems to be a widespread belief and conception”, says a participant, “that all the real problems in the world require a truck.”

Above and Beyond the Finish Line

The event is sponsored by Xtracycle Bikes, a Bay Area cargo bike company, which has been advocating for emergency response by bike since 2002. Mike Cobb, Paul Freedman from Rock the Bike, Ross Evans and Nate Byerly from Xtracycle put their heads together and created “The Life Bike”, which Byerly described as a “cargo bike designed for EMTs”. Equipped with a backboard, oxygen, a defibrillator, and other emergency medical supplies, it was designed to provide 911 responders with a means to respond to any incident, in any way possible.

Although the Life Bike was never commercially produced and sold, the team has continued to collaborate with the WorldBike.org project, “a non-profit” Byerly wrote, “that innovates and advocates for bikes in developing world settings.”

As to which bike he would recommend in case of a large scale collapse – Byerly pointed to the Edge Runner, citing “low center of gravity, virtually indestructible small rear wheel, extensive climbing gear range, and quality components” as advantageous benefits in the Disaster Relief Trials race. Xtracycle has donated two bikes which Mike Cobb will optimize for disaster response ahead of the Disaster Relief Trials event.

edge_runner_xtracycle

Integrating Cargo Bikes in Disaster Relief Plans

In a recent blog post, FEMA underlined the need for teamwork in creating a successful emergency plan. The creative addition of cargo bikes to a plan’s toolkit seems to be an easy sell so far. As the Disaster Relief Trials event grows, and the idea of cargo bikes as an tool in times of emergency spreads, the partnership and integration of cargo bikes could become more institutionalized.

And once the value of applying cargo bikes to disaster relief is demonstrated, says Mike Cobb “the discussion of ‘how’ can take place.” Most cities have a program for citizen-led disaster response (see below for links to find one near you), which “allocate basic equipment and training to volunteer citizens who are willing to provide neighborhood-scale disaster recovery leadership and assistance. These small networks,” says Cobb, “could provide the best opportunity for cargo bike response management. I can imagine a registry of cargo bike owners who receive basic training and are willing to be pressed into service during times of need.”

Related links:

Disaster Relief Trials Website

Disaster Relief Trials bring cargo-bike heroism back to Portland – Bike Portland

Going Green: Cargo Bikes Empower Portland Communities in Disaster Preparedness – FEMA

Portland’s Neighborhood Emergency Response Team page

FEMA’s Community Emergency Response page

Find a CERT near you

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Fietsklik Crate and Klik

After a successful Kickstarter that raised close to $80K in May of 2014, Fietsklik is officially in business. You can buy their two main products, the Crate and the Klik, from their online store here.

The Klik is the centerpiece: it is a platform to which all Fietsklik products attach, fitting on any standard rear rack. At the moment only the Crate is available for purchase, but more carriers were designed during the Kickstarter: a messenger bag, a pannier, a laptop bag as well as a child seat.

The flagship Crate is a collapsible basket-like cargo carrier which, when off the bike, has wheels and a strap for rolling around. The idea for the crate, the founders write, “when three high-school friends with a love for bicycles dropped a crate of beer from the back of a bike” and subsequently realized there was no good way to transport a large number of beers (or other goods) by bike.

Fietsklik, which means “Bike Click” in Dutch, is based in Amsterdam and manufactures all of their products in the Netherlands: “Our design office and garage are in Amsterdam while we use an injection molding facility and an assembly space just under two hours away. All of our plastic parts are made there, 100% of the Klik and Crate. Besides the nuts and bolts, the only component that comes from outside of our home country is the polyester for the bags which is upcycled from excess materials used by a major sporting goods manufacturer.”

Featured in:

Gizmag – Design Boom – Cool Hunting

Links:

www.fietsklik.com

Fietsklik Crate and Klik

Fietsklik Crate and Klik

Fietsklik Klik
Fietsklik Klik

 

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International Cargo Bike Festival

International Cargo Bike Festival

International Cargo Bike Festival

This year the International Cargo Bike Festival celebrates its third edition on 12 and 13 April 2014 at Cultuurspinnerij de Vasim in Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
The Cargo Bike Festival is the biggest platform for cargobikes and cyclelogistics in the world.

On Saturda

y 12 April the European Cycle Logistics Federation Conference is being held with national and international key note speakers.
Sunday 13 April welcomes the exhibition where visitors, users, designers, manufacturers, DIY-builders and retailers of cargo bikes meet and enter in new relationships.

The European Cyclelogistics Federation participates in the organisation of the event, as does the municipality of Nijmegen and Arnhem Nijmegen City Region.

http://www.cargobikefestival.com/

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Promoting Cargo Cycling in the European Union

Back in May 2011, representatives from NGOs, the government, private sector business and industry analysis firms met in Copenhagen, Denmark to share different ideas for advancing the shift of goods and services transportation to non-motorized modes in European cities. This meeting also lies within the context of the CYCLE Logistics project, whose ultimate goal for 2014 is to save 1,300 tons (465,000 gallons) of fuel, put2,000 more cargo cycles into use in European Union (EU) cities, and shift 10,000 trips to inter-modal transport chains (bicycles and tricycles used with other modes of transportation).
They are trying to encourage CYCLE Logistics under the European Cycling Federation to promote the benefits of cargo cycling. Businesses who use cargo cycling give customers an image of environmental responsibility, they also have a better chance of delivering their goods on time without having to deal with traffic and road infrastructures.
Accessibility is also increased for those business who use cargo tricycles to reach out to people, where stores cannot. As a result, replacing motorized transportation with cargo cycles does not contribute to air quality degradation and pollution.

This is not the first time Europe tries to really encourage the use of cargo cycling as a real means of transport. In the United States, we often regard cargo cycling as a fun weekend pastime or leisurely activity. We don’t really see cargo scooters as being used for professional use – but it’s coming! What really needs to happen, which is what the CYCLE Logistics project strives to do, is promote a behavioral change within a culture. They try pushing Europeans to transport goods and services with cargo cycles—among all individuals, organizations, businesses and levels of government.

In China actually, this has already been the case for a long time. In large cities with dense populations, millions of bicycles and cargo tricycles are being employed for daily transportation of people and goods. Whether it transports garbage, fruit, a mini barbecue, stacks of chairs or hay, the Chinese have been very creative in using cargo scooters in any way to help them with their business or wherever they need to go.

The population density of Chinese cities has resulted in hundreds of millions of bicycles and tricycles being employed for daily transportation, many of which are utilized in the cargo fashions that the CYCLE Logistics project desires to produce.

To read more about this movement and CYCLE Logistics, please visit and read the article from  http://thecityfix.com/blog/the-eu-meets-to-discuss-how-to-promote-cargo-cycling/

Posted in bakfiets, City Cycling, Commuting, Family Cycling, Load Carrying, other topics, Places & Events, Useful References, Work CyclingComments (8)

The Danish Cargo Bike Championships, a classic Copenhagen tradition

Have you ever dreamt about racing your cargo scooter with friends? Well, cargo scooter fans in Copenhagen have already been doing this for the past 11 years!

Every year the Svajerløbet – or the Danish Cargo Bike Championships – takes place in the Carlsberg area in Copenhagen.They have championships in several categories, such as the Svajerløb for kids, men, women, vintage cargo bikes, two or three wheel bikes! It is a non-profit event, really for those who love their cargo bikes.

The name Svajerløb comes from city’s bicycle messengers – known as ‘svajere’ who, decades ago, used to battle in unofficial races for bragging rights on Israels Plads in central Copenhagen.  It was a classic Copenhagen event that disappeared when cars started to dominate the urban landscape. The last race was in 1960. But as a capital full of cargo cyclists, there was much support given to revive the tradition in 2009.

In fact, there are around 40,000 cargo bikes in use each day in Greater Copenhagen and they are the Copenhagen version of the SUV, used for transporting children and goods. 25% of all families with two or more children have a cargo bike in the City of Copenhagen.

If you ever fancy to participate in the race, check out their website: http://www.dmforladcykler.dk/English2011.php

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EcoSpeed Electric Power Assist

EcoSpeed is a Portland based company that manufactures high performance electric power assist systems for bicycles. Their systems come with either a 700Watt or 1000Watt high torque motor, that will blow away most other add on systems. What makes their design unique is the use of a freewheeled crankset, that allows the rider to power a bicycle without the cranks rotating along with the motor like a fixed gear bicycle.

The workmanship looks fantastic and we’ve heard great things about their performance. The only drawback is the high initial cost. The starting price for a complete system is $2800. Add that to the cost of a brand new European or American built bakfiets and you’re looking at a starting price of around $5000, which is about the same cost as a used street legal GEM electric car.

We hope that as the popularity of these systems increase, the costs will go down with economies of scale. If price is no object and performance is your number one criteria, then you’ll love Ecospeed. Also as you shop for a power assist system, you might want to check out another Portland based manufacturer Stokemonkey as well.

Links:
EcoSpeed Homepage
Stokemonkey

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WARNING: The Big China Rip Off

We’ve seen some shops trying to make money off of growing interest in cargo tricycles and bakfiets. However, a lot of them are either price gouging customers or they’re getting ripped off by their suppliers. These shops are selling Chinese built cargo bicycles for five times the manufacturing and shipping costs. How does a cargo tricycle costing $275/unit plus $100 (shipping, customs, & storage), retail for $2100?

To make matters worse, some of these shops are implying that these tricycles and bakfiets are Dutch built. They’ve got names like Dutch this and Dutch that with websites that imply the same. For example one shop we talked with didn’t even mention that the bikes were built in China until we asked them directly. They gave us an explanation of how they retrofit these tricycles with high quality US and Euro parts, yata yata yata. A week later that same shop updated their website to say that the bikes were built in China.

We did a group buy of ten of these same tricycles and bakfiets a couple of years ago and learned a great deal about the pricing, shipping, customs, etc. The conclusion, Chinese made cargo tricycles and bakfiets should retail to the consumer for at most $1000. Even with a 100% markup over cost and $50 to have someone assemble the bike, it’s realistic that these “China” trikes and “China” bakfiets could retail at $750 with profit.

If you’re interested in reading more about what we learned from our group buy experience, please let us know by commenting on this post and we’ll try to answer your questions.

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Grocery Cart Bicycle

This is a great idea. Not sure how well it works, but you’ve got to give Ryan McFarland kudos for coming up with this idea and for recycling. He’s got tons of other interesting projects he’s built on instructables.com and his blog which is worth checking out.

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Flickr Gallery: China Cargo Tricycles

Here’s a nice photo gallery of cargo tricycles in China by BriColeurbanism.

Links:
• Photo Gallery of Cargo Tricycles in China
• Bricoleurbanism.org Website

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Mobile Graffiti Trike

A really cool platform for projection or laser graffiti artists. If you don’t know what projection graffiti is check out Graffiti Research Lab’s Blog. It’s really cool.

Link:
Graffiti Research Lab

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The Perils of Hybrid Design – Triobike Redux

Triobike is a Danish company that makes a family tricycle with a nifty “Multi-purpose Design” which can be converted from a tricycle to a bicycle to a stroller. On paper it has many of the design features that families are looking for such as 5 point harnesses for kids, front & rear lights, disk brakes, etc. It’s sleek minimalist European industrial design will send hearts aflutter anywhere. Who wouldn’t want a tricycle you could drive the kids to daycare with, convert into a bicycle, and then ride to work with.

However in the case of Triobike, it’s Achilles Heal may be that it does neither of it’s intended purposes very well. As a tricycle, reviewers are beginning to talk about it’s dangerously unstable ride. As a bicycle, it’s sporty design doesn’t lend itself well for city riding (no fenders, uncomfortable forward leaning style, men’s style swing over frame) Finally as a stroller it’s unwieldy bulk makes it impractical. Imagine a parent struggling to load it into a car or better yet trying to get it through the doorway of a local store with a sleeping toddler on board.

Hybrid designs in and of themselves are a neat idea. They take up less space but serve multiple purposes. However, history has been marked with endless hybrid designs that try to do too many things and fail to do any well. Airplanes that convert into a car, cars that convert into a boat, and so on.

In the case of Triobike, it’s a great idea with flawed execution. Like any groundbreaking innovative design there will be growing pains and hopefully an evolution to an ideal form. If the makers of Triobike continue to refine and iterate the design, then it has a great future. Otherwise, it’ll remain another industrial design study where style has won out over function, with the added bonus of a $3000 USD price tag.

Triobike Links:
www.triobike.com
Triobike photos by Carteco
Triobike Video

Other Luxury Cargo Tricycle Makers:
Winther Kangaroo
Nihola
MyZigo (US manufacturer)

Posted in Tech Talk, tricyclesComments (10)

Great Video: Geekhouse Bikes

My friend Frank just sent me this link to a great video of a bicycle being made at Geekhouse Bikes. From the looks of their website, these guys build great custom bicycles. Keep up the great work guys.

Posted in City Cycling, DIY, VideosComments (3)

Military Bicycle – US Army Paratroopers and Marines

Montague Bicycle Company has been making folding bicycles for the US military since 1997. These bicycles are foldable and can be parachuted in with soldiers and marines. They are currently being tested for use by US Army Special Forces.

Check out their website for videos and photos.
Montague Military Bicycles Promo Video Page

Posted in bicycles, Load Carrying, Videos, Work CyclingComments (156)

Air Pollution in China

air pollution china

air pollution china

I generally try to keep this blog upbeat and focused on bicycles. But, the other day I found a picture I took a couple of years ago during a business trip to China. The photo speaks for itself… The air pollution in China is awful…

This picture was taken in Ningbo City, about three hours drive from Shanghai. In the early 1990s, most people in China were still using bicycles or mass transit. Cars were a luxury for the rich. Back then the air was clean given the size of the population. But now in many of the factory towns across China, your eyes water as soon as you step out the front door.

The sad thing is we keep blaming China for all of this, but most of those poluting factories are making products that are bound for US and European markets. Basically we’ve just exported our pollution creating factories and jobs to China. Anyway, everytime I go to Costco, I always get a sense that I’m just adding to this cycle…

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Dual Pull Brake Lever

Dual_pull_brakes
I thought I’d re-post about these really cool dual pull brake levers I installed on my front load cargo tricycle (2 wheels up front 1 wheel in back). I’ve had them on the trike for about 6 months and they work great! Basically, you can run two brake cables from two different brake sets into one lever and the lever balances the pull going to both sets of brakes.

Inside the lever there is a little mechanism that balances the pull between the two brake lines. That way you have equal pressure going to both front brakes on the trike when you pull the lever. What this means for cargo tricycles is that you can have one lever that actuates both front wheels equally without any brake steering effect. Brake steering is when one wheel brakes harder than the other, which pulls the tricycle violently to the left or right when braking.

In practice, you still need to make sure that your brakes are tuned similarly. Meaning that you can’t have one brake cable totally loose with the other one completely tight and still hope that the dual pull brake lever will work it’s magic. However, if you spend the time to at least adjust your brake cables reasonably, these things work great!

If you do a Google search for “dual pull brake lever” there are a lot of companies selling these. I think I got mine for about $12 USD.

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New Urbanism

I ran into this video about New Urbanism, which is the trend in urban planning which promotes walkable livable cities. This video is a really cool intro to the whole idea. Hopefully the idea of using bicycles for transport in these new cities will take off.

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Ghetto Engineering

Bicycle crank repaired with welded on construction rebar

Bicycle crank repaired with welded on construction rebar

Here’s a picture I took in Korea of a repaired delivery bike. Rather than throw away the bike or broken part, the owner just welded construction rebar to fix a broken crank. I love seeing old bicycles evolve and take on a life of their own. I guess when you have to use your bicycle everyday for work, it’s a completely different mindset from people using bicycles for sport. Things aren’t perfect, but they’re useful.

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Stoke Monkey


Stoke Monkey is a electric power-assist unit that fits on a extra long chain-stay bike, such as a bike equipped with an Xtracycle setup.  It works by a variable-speed throttle on the handlebar and a tandem-like drivetrain setup.  Once the motor is on, the rider would have to pedal along (like a tandem stoker).  They claim a cruising speed of 30 mph on the flats.

To the right is a Sycip longbike equipped with a Stoke Monkey.

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Interview Questions for Cargo Bike Company Owners

Hi Cargocycling Readers,

Thank you very much for being loyal visitors to our site. In order to improve the site, we’re thinking about adding an “Interviews” category to the site where we interview some bicycle designers, company owners, etc. We’re hoping to start by interviewing the owner & creator of a well know cargo bicycle company.

In order to make this a collaborative process, we’d like to hear from you the kinds of questions you’d like us to ask and so on. So please leave any comments on this post on potential questions, people to interview, etc.

Thanks! From the happy team at Cargocycling.org

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Portland Bicycle Culture

There was a great New York Times article and video cast about the bicycle culture in Portland Oregon.

NY Times Video
NY Times Article

The citizens of Portland have done a great job of making Portland one of the most vibrant and livable cities in the US. It’s got everything a world class city has to offer and you’re only a short ride from some very scenic areas such as the Columbia River Gorge. Definitely a great place for a bicycle holiday.

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Aileron Trike: Tilting Three Wheeler

Inventor Wayne Soohoo has been working years on a system that allows a tricycle to lean into turns. The leaning allows tricycles to go into turns at higher speeds with stability. Although it looks like there haven’t been many updates to his site for years, there is a treasure full of great information for anyone thinking of building their own leaning tricycle. Hopefully, someday we’ll see a mainstream leaning tricycle based on his designs.  Keep up the great work Wayne!

Link: http://www.maxmatic.com/soohoo.htm

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Chinese Bicycle Factories

A few months ago during a business trip to China, my friend an import export broker invited me to visit some bicycle factories with him during my day off. Always on the lookout for new products and suppliers for his clients, he regularly visits Chinese factories. I jumped at the chance and toured three different bike factories with him.

The factories were in Tianjin City about an hour outside of Beijing. Tianjin is a massive port and factory town. The city is drab and heavily polluted. You literally couldn’t see more than three blocks due to the air pollution. Tianjin is famous in China for being the hub of bicycle manufacturing in China. With over 200 bicycle companies in Tianjin, we only had time to visit three.

The factories varied greatly. The first was a former gov’t owned company that made sturdy low-end bicycles for sale in developing countries. The second was a state of the art OEM supplier for US bike companies. The last was a modern factory that made bicycles for the China market under their own brand name.

The first factory we visited, the Tianjin Flying Pigeon Bicycle Company, was a former gov’t owned company. It is a fixture in Chinese society, famous for having made billions of bicycles since it was established by Chairman Mao fifty years ago. You’ll see their classic bicycles providing basic transportation for people all over the developing world.

What surprised me most about the TFPBC was how friendly the people were. They had an easy going rythmn similar to farmers working the fields and were always easy with a smile. The factory was run in an informal style and the buildings showed their age. There were even a couple of stray dogs that the workers adopted that were wandering the factory. The equipment was old, manufacturing techniques dated, and quality control questionable. I even saw workers smoking cigarettes while working the line. However for me the whole experience was like a history lesson. Entering their factory was like traveling back in time to the communist era.

The Factory Experience: Time proven manufacturing methods for the world’s most popular bicycle…

Although they manufacture other bicycles these days, they continue to build the classic Flying Pigeon Bike. Their biggest customer thesedays, the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Photos: Tianjin Flying Pigeon Bicycle Company Factory Photos I’ll post more about Tianjin City and the other factories later. Stay tuned and thanks for stopping by.

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